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Curriculum PLUS

valid from the 2019/20 school year

G7 Learning area 1: Methods and working techniques

The students apply basic Methods and working techniques of the subject of history in the implementation of the learning areas G 7.2 to G 7.8. They use the Basic data and terms from the history of the Middle Ages to the time of absolutism, in order to orientate oneself in time and to be able to form a meaningful narration on the chronology of the grade.
Competence Expectations

The students ...

  • develop sources by means of prepared questions and put them first source-critical questions to the author. In particular, they delimit image and material sources (e.g. leaflets from the time of the Reformation) from later ones Historical images (e.g. history pictures) and Reconstructions from.
  • form historical Narratives, possibly. with design and creative standards (e.g. comic, reconstruction picture, radio play script), in which they supplement the Christian-Eurocentric view with further perspectives, such as B. View of the Jews, the Muslims, the South and Central American natives, the Africans or the Ottomans.
  • examine simple statistics and Diagrams (e.g. on the social history of the city) and Graphs (e.g. for building society) and explain or complete history cards, such as B. to territorial changes or voyages of discovery.
  • use characteristics typical of the Romanesque, Gothic and Baroque periods to describe selected buildings (possibly the home area) in terms of their shape and function.
  • use both printed and selected digital media (e.g. suitable websites) in order to find specific answers to historical questions.

G7 Learning area 2: Life and rule in the Middle Ages (approx. 20 hours)

Competence Expectations

The students ...

  • recognize that through the Christian forms of life and rule as well as through the historical developments in the middle Ages important foundations of European culture and statehood were created. To do this, compare the im middle Ages existing close connection between Christian religion and political rule with the situation in a modern state.
  • examine z. B. on the basis of simple history maps and diagrams different structures and developments of the Middle Ages (e.g. travel royalty, territorialization).
  • evaluate simple pictorial and written sources on the emergence of the Ottonian Empire and on the Investiture Controversy to understand the different ways in which rulership is justified.
  • use simple examples of architecture (e.g. on churches and stately homes) and court culture to examine the Christian imagery and symbolic language and the medieval world in order to identify the relics of that time that are still visible in our cultural environment and theirs to assess cultural value.
  • analyze the reasons and causes for the urban boom (e.g. using contemporary image and text sources) and verbalize various aspects that shape urban life as well as the structures and peculiarities of the medieval city (e.g. in a city museum or in a City exploration).
  • record external threats to which people were exposed in the Middle Ages (e.g. epidemics, bad harvests) and examine how people dealt with these challenges.
  • provide examples of the expansion (geographical, economic, scientific) of the medieval worldview through the Crusades and discuss the cultural exchange against the background of religious differences. B. Source texts by Christian and Muslim authors on the Crusades evaluate.
  • derive from the historical encounter of different peoples and cultures (e.g. Crusades) the need for peaceful dialogue.
  • divide life and rule in the Middle Ages, among other things. using the basic data 962 Imperial coronation of Otto the Great and around 1200 cultural bloom at the time of the Hohenstaufen.
  • apply the basic terms Manorial rule, feudal system, nobility, investiture dispute, crusade, town charter, citizens, ghetto, electors, estates, monastery safe on.
Contents of the competencies:
  • Emergence of the Ottonian Empire; Role of the king
  • Nobles and peasants in medieval agrarian and feudal society: Manorial rule and Fiefdom
  • Monasteries as defining elements
  • Church and secular rule: Imperial Church, Investiture Controversy
  • king and Empire: Imperial estates in the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation, approaches to territorialization
  • courtly culture of the Hohenstaufen era, knighthood; Romanesque and Gothic
  • City in middle Ages: Urban development, trade, self-government, imperial cities, society, performance and special position of the Jewish population; possibly regional reference
  • external threats (e.g. famine, epidemics)
  • Crusades: religious and military confrontation and cultural encounter

G7 Learning area 5: Early modern Europe between denominational disputes and absolutist claims to power (approx. 10 hours)

Competence Expectations

The students ...

  • examine main reasons leading to Thirty Years War and led to the new European state system after 1648, and in this context assess the pursuit of peaceful solutions to political and religious issues of conflict in the present.
  • assess the consequences of early modern warfare (e.g. impact on the population in the Thirty Years War), by creating a regional and, if necessary, regional reference.
  • recognize from the example of the French absolutismthat this form of rule changed the state and society in Europe. You use this knowledge to z. B. cultural evidence (e.g. residences, parks), but also the beginnings of modern state structures (e.g. administration, infrastructure, standing army).
  • describe the role model of the French absolutism for Europe's princes on the basis of the mansion buildings of the epoch by examining a state historical (possibly a regional) example of the baroque and its representative function.
  • grasp the principle of the “balance of power” and describe the problem of a hegemonic foreign policy as a permanent threat to peace in Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries.
  • apply the basic data 1618–1648 Thirty Years War and 17./18. Century. Absolutism in Europe and the basic terms Peace of Westphalia, absolutism, hegemony in the context of sure.
Contents of the competencies:

G7 Learning area 6: Buildings as an expression of political and religious thought (longitudinal section) (approx. 5 hours)

In the longitudinal section “Buildings as an Expression of Political and Religious Thought”, the pupils repeat, network and deepen historical knowledge and skills and, in particular, apply them Basic data and terms in a new context.
Competence Expectations

The students ...

  • use the knowledge that certain buildings provide information about the political or social self-image of their clients or an era in order to grasp the significance of historical buildings that they perceive in their everyday life or in the media.
  • analyze similarities and differences between buildings from different epochs and possibly different religions on the basis of given criteria by including Examine photographs, paintings, plans and sketches and make comparisons with today's public buildings. They discuss which understanding of rulership or which social order is evident in the monuments examined.
  • compare the original function of historical buildings with their current function and discuss the purpose and purpose of monument protection.
  • assign selected historical buildings to the epochs Antiquity, the Middle Ages and Modern times give reasons and use basic data and terms of history, such as B. 5th century BC Heyday of Athens; 800 coronation as emperor of Charlemagne; 17./18. Century absolutism in Europe; Polis, democracy, monarchy, king, emperor, monastery, Christianity, Judaism, Islam, absolutism and aristocracyto describe the connections between architecture, form of rule and religion.
Contents of the competencies:

G7 Learning area 7: Exchange of goods and cultural transfer (longitudinal section) (approx. 5 hours)

In the longitudinal section “Exchange of goods and cultural transfer”, the pupils repeat, network and deepen historical knowledge and skills and apply them in particular Basic data and terms in a new context.
Competence Expectations

The students ...

  • recognize the connection between economy, politics and culture in the historical longitudinal section. They use their knowledge about Antiquity, the Middle Ages and Modern timesto name differences and similarities to today's globalized world.
  • use the Upper Germanic-Rhaetian Limes to examine the structural control of trade relations and describe the long-term effects of cultural contact between Romans and Germanic peoples on language and living environment. In doing so, they gain the insight that economic relationships and the resulting cultural exchange have shaped the world of people at all times.
  • use the example of the Hanseatic League to explain how a supraregional trade network developed based on economic success, among other things. shaped urban culture across states and countries in the long term, or use the example of the Fuggers to explain the interaction between the exchange of goods and cultural transfer by examining their global economic and political relationships (e.g. Fugger as kingmakers) as well as their cultural achievements (e.g. B. Fugger as patron and founder).
  • apply basic data and terms known to them, such as B. Limes, Romanization, province, manorial rule, town charter, citizens, Middle Ages, Renaissance or Modern times, safe to describe the connections between trade relations and cultural contacts.
Contents of the competencies:
  • Trade and cultural contact on limes
  • Trade network of the Hanseatic League in Northern Europe or Southern German early capitalism using the example of the Fuggers