When did Evangelism explosion in Uganda begin

Self-transformation and charismatic evangelical identity

Francis Müller uses an ethnosemantic approach to investigate a Swiss and a Ghanaian charismatic evangelical community in the greater Zurich area. The central element in the two communities is conversion and the associated self-transformation, which is associated with different cultural issues in the two communities. The desired radical self-transformation is risky because it implies a break with habits and previous life. Different techniques and normative identities are conveyed in the two communities that show how to deal with this discontinuity and how to live in a modern, secular world at all. The author thus makes a contribution to sociological conversion research.

The content

  • Religion, Modernity and Secularization
  • Charismatic evangelicalism
  • Ethnographic field research and analysis
  • Charismatic evangelical identity as a "becoming"

 

The target groups

  • Lecturers and students in sociology, ethnology and religious studies

 

The author

Francis Müller is a lecturer in design research, ethnography and sociological theories of identity in the design department of the Zurich University of the Arts. He has lectureships at the HSG (University of St. Gallen) and at the Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City.

Keywords

African Diaspora Religion Charismatic Evangelicalism Ethnology Interculturality Conversion

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Design, Zurich University of the Arts, Zurich, Switzerland

About the authors

Francis Müller is a lecturer in design research, ethnography and sociological theories of identity in the design department of the Zurich University of the Arts. He has lectureships at the HSG (University of St. Gallen) and at the Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City.

Bibliographic information