How to say family in Vietnamese


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ZoraVietnam
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Registration date: May 24, 2016
Posts: 4




Posted: May 24th, 2016, 8:29 pm Forms of address in Vietnamese

Shark

(FIRST TIME: I'm already sorry if I post anything wrong, I still have a few problems finding my way here ...)

I'm new here and I'm almost 14, but I'm very interested in Vietnam and would like to spend my exchange student year there, but that's still a bit off (it'll start in 3 years).
Well, in any case, I started to learn Vietnamese on my own, with an app that was rated well and I like it very much. (It cost 19 €) I can already say greetings, goodbyes, around 100 words (there are "native speakers" who say all the sentences in the app and I've researched and the pronunciation seems to be really correct ...)

So now to my "problem":

In Vietnamese, the forms of address are apparently a little more complicated.
Personal pronouns are impolite, so to speak.

Can someone explain to me exactly how it all works? Of course I did some research, one apparently says "the (somewhat) older" (angh or so now everything without paying attention to the spelling) or "the (somewhat) older" (Chi)
And em too younger?

What exactly do you say now when you want to say the following to friends or family:

You're nice. (e.g. female a bit older)
You are my mother.
You are my father
You're my girlfriend. (same age)
You are my brother / sister (older)

And how do you address older people (around 50 that you know so well)

e.g.

You are my teacher
You are my teacher.

And then how do you address your grandparents?

You are my grandpa
You are my grandma

And last but not least

How do you address someone formally.
(I've heard that this person is valued, then partly as older (same salutation as with grandfather or something)

I hope someone could take the time to explain this to me and translate the example sentences.

Thank you & # 55357; & # 56479;



Edit by Courti: Topic postponed.
    
Toni B.
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Registration date: October 29, 2013
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Place of residence: NRW



Written on: May 26, 2016, 11:46 am (no title)

Hello,
"Du" (may) is hardly used in the Vietnamese language and the idiom, there are exceptions in some regions such as in the Mekong Delta, here fathers or mothers (or older generations) talk to the children but not the other way around!
Basically with older people, ong (grandpa, stranger with old age), ba (father) or ma (mother), anh (big brother), chi (big sister) are used. for younger generations "em" (younger brothers or sister) or "chau" (cousin, cousins)
Using "you" when talking to older people is rude in Vietnam, even to father-in-law or mother-in-law.
As I said, the Vietnamese language is one of the most difficult languages ​​in the world because of its idiom.
So for example:
not you are my father, but this gentleman is my father (ong nay la ba toi)
you are not my teacher, but this lady is my teacher (Ba nay la co giao toi).
If you have any questions, please contact my pn.
VG, Toni B.
    
Bhadresvaravarman






Registration date: 10/26/2010
Posts: 554




Posted: May 26th, 2016, 11:52 am (no title)

"Du" (may) is rarely used in the Vietnamese language and the idiom, there are exceptions in some regions such as in the Mekong Delta, here fathers or mothers (or older generations) talk to the children but not the other way around!


May is considered very rude here in the Mekong Delta. It's only used between non-relatives when you want to show that you really see someone as "filth". I really advise against the use of tao / may!
    
Bombula
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Registration date: 05/29/2015
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Place of residence: Hanoi



Written on: May 27, 2016, 2:39 am (no title)

It is a very complex topic, the address depends on the age, gender and, if applicable, the social rank of the person you are talking to in relation to you ...

Teachers, because they have a higher reputation, are always addressed with "cô" (aunt) or "chú" (uncle).

You can also use "bạn" for friends / acquaintances of about the same age. Means "friend" for example, but NOT for parents, grandparents or very much younger people etc.!

You are nice / pretty = bạn đẹp (to friends / acquaintances of the same age)
You are nice / pretty = em đẹp (to younger people regardless of whether they are known or not)

So far, however, nobody has taken it seriously if I addressed him incorrectly. Foreigners will be forgiven

Here is what I think is explained quite nicely with the salutations:
http://keovietnam.blogspot.com/2013/07/vietnamesische-anredeformen.html

I would at least advise you to take a crash course in Vietnamese if you want to stay here for a while. The language is very different
    
Wellbeing
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Written on: May 31, 2016, 05:28 am (no title)

You or you cannot be translated into Vietnamese.
Some say you = May. That is actually not true. Because in German you say you to your parents, but in Vietnamese you don't say May to your parents.


May is used by close friends of the same age or older with younger members of the family or relatives, it is not rude, a very normal form of speech.
But if people don't know each other and use May, then it means they are anti-social, uneducated.

The Vietnamese forms of address are varied but not difficult. Because there are rules for it.
    
Banh Mi
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Registration date: 10/31/2016
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Place of residence: Würzburg



Written on: Oct 31, 2016, 7:33 am (no title)

Hi,

First of all, big price, for your 14 years you are already very far! In general, it will always take you to learn a new foreign language.

However, I want to give you an important note about Vietnamese. As you probably know, it's a tonal language, your intonation is absolutely crucial to being understood.
If you now teach yourself Vietnamese with an app, no teacher will check the correct intonation. Please don't underestimate that, I was in Vietnam myself. If you don't hit a note exactly, you won't be understood at all.

The Vietnamese are simply not used to someone with an "accent" speaking their language. Maybe you can find a language course near you, especially at the beginning that would be a great help. Just have a look in Google.

Good luck and stay tuned
    
Kun
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Registration date: 09/27/2010
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Written on: 11/01/2016, 1:35 am (no title)

You're nice. (e.g. female a little older) = Chị hiền
You are my mother. = Mẹ là Mẹ của Con. (Always address mom with Mẹ / Má, even if you say "You" to her, always Mẹ / Má.
You are my father = Ba / Bố là Ba / Bố của Con (see above like Mama)
You're my girlfriend. (same age) = Cậu / Bạn là bạn của tôi / tớ or Mày là bạn của tao. (if you are really good friends.)
You are my brother / sister (older) = Anh / Chị là anh / chị của em.

And how do you address older people (around 50 that you know so well)

Well, if they are already old like Grandpa / Grandma, then Ông / Bà and if they are older, but cannot yet be classified as Grandpa / Grandma, then Bác (regardless of whether male or female)

You are my teacher = Cô là cô giáo của em. (Students are addressed with "em")
You are my teacher. = Thầy là thầy giáo của em.

And then how do you address your grandparents?

You are my grandpa = Ông là Ông của Cháu. (If you talk to Ông, Bà, Cô, Chú, Bác, ..., you are "Cháu")
You are my grandma = Bà là Bà của Cháu.

Ông Ngoại / Bà Ngoại = Grandpa, grandma on the mother's side
Ông Nội / Bà Nội = Grandpa Grandma on the father's side

How do you address someone formally.
(I've heard that this person is valued, then sometimes as older (same salutation as grandfather or something)

Treasures e.g. whether the person is older than your parents (Bác), younger (Cô / Chú), grandpa / grandma age (Ông / Bà). If the person is around your age you can say "Anh / Chị", younger then "Em" or if you have no idea then "Bạn".
    


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